Some Fun WordPress Stats

by Krishna on February 5, 2009

WordPress.com just published their statistics for the month of January:

372,519 blogs were created.
393,836 new users joined.
4,592,097 file uploads.
2,710 gigabytes of new files.
553 terabytes of content transferred from our datacenters.
8,771,891 comments.
6,528,657 logins.
1,073,421,738 pageviews on WordPress.com, and another 945,105,050 on self-hosted blogs (2,018,526,788 total across all WordPress blogs we track).
1,373,108 active blogs and 18,768,022 active posts where “active” means they got a human visitor.
1,295,531,829 words.

Using that, you can derive some interesting facts, such as:

  1. The average blog receives 6 comments per month, about a comment or so every week. There is one comment for every 122 page views.
  2. The average active blog received 25 page views per day. However, this value is the mean. It might be useful to know what the median page views for a blog is.
  3. Assuming that all words were produced by active blogs, the average blog author produced 944 words per month, or 30 words per day. That is 20% of the maximum length of a Tweet.

Also, 66% of all WordPress blogs are in English, followed by Spanish (8%), Indonesian (5%) and Portuguese (4%).

When talking about WordPress for serious bloggers, Dan Woodman, the ex-Microsoft Solutions Advisor who got himself a Blue Monster tattoo, quickly found that WordPress.com was not for him:

I then realized that this is not the place for my blog — it’s too limiting.  I don’t really mind not being able to run ads (I don’t delude myself into thinking that I am going to turn this blog into my sole job.  I simply enjoy it and want to be able to continue blogging), but I do want to be able to track my readership.  That’s important — having a readership of an unknown magnitude is not quite as impressive as being able to say I have a blog readership of “X.”  I’d also like to know what is working and what isn’t… so, the long and short of it is that I need to move my blog (again).

I agree. For casual blogging, any blogging site would do. But Google Blogger is perhaps a better place to get started with hosting your blog if you plan to build a readership. I don’t know when Blogger will return to asking money, but for the time being, it offers a lot of functionality for zero or little cost.

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